The events of the past several years have brought many of us to a place
of collective understanding in an elemental, deep in the bones kind of
way, that truly anything can happen. My current work is about the loss
of innocence, a place where beauty and its destruction inevitably coexist. The trajectory of my life, as with most of us, has born witness to moments of unfettered joy as well as profound loss. I have experienced guileless innocence, beauty, deterioration, and death. These elements are fundamental and irrefutable markers of life.

I have cultivated a reverence for unseen, discarded, and forgotten. The use of found materials has been the soul of my practice. I reclaim discarded objects and ephemera which evoke for me the fragility of beauty and the passage of time. I see these elements as having their own unique spirit
and life, their own heartbeat. They deserve to be honored as they are
and manipulated as little as possible. I use paint, paper, and other media as well, but the reclaimed material I use is central to my work.

My practice as an architect for many years is integral to what I make. Three-dimensional pieces imbed themselves in my work on the wall or suspend from the ceiling to tell their tales. My pieces are stories. I use my materials with reverence. Much of my work evokes alters without insisting on this reading. The soul of my work speaks to my deep roots growing up and spending most of my life in the South. There’s blood in the soil here.
I feel it and I honor it.